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Dry full loads of similar items

By Recyclebank |
Lightweight clothes dry more quickly than heavier ones. Filling your machine with similar items to prevent your dryer from working too hard will save time, money, and energy.
Drying full loads of laundry is always a good idea since your machine works just as hard with small loads as it does with big loads. Without overfilling, drying full loads of similar items will save energy and CO2, and might even leave a little extra cash in your pocket.

How to dry full loads of similar items

  1. After washing your clothes, divide them into different piles by fabric-type. Heavier items such as coats should be grouped separately from lighter items such as summer clothes and underwear.
  2. Make sure each pile contains enough clothes to be considered a full load. But don't overfill your machine--there needs to be enough room for air to circulate.
  3. Load the first pile into the dryer and dry normally, using your dryer's moisture sensor and perma-press cycle whenever possible.
  4. To save even more energy, hang your laundry on a clothes line to get them mostly dry. When they are still a little damp, follow points one and two above to give them a quick fluff and final dry.

Drying full loads of similar items helps you go green because…

  • It saves energy, which will reduce the amount of CO2 emitted with each load of laundry.
Lighter, synthetic fabrics dry much more quickly than heavier pieces such as jeans and towels.[1] If different fabric types are combined in the same load, lighter pieces will dry sooner, after which they'll be tossed around in hot air unnecessarily. Over-drying wastes energy and increases the costs of doing laundry. Because over-drying often damages or shrinks fabrics, an additional benefit of drying similar items together is less wear-and-tear on clothes.[2]

When running, a dryer uses the same amount of energy regardless of load size. Therefore, it is more efficient to dry full rather than partial loads of laundry.[3]

External links

Footnotes

  1. Rocky Mountain Institute - Home Energy Briefs #6: Cleaning Appliances
  2. Consumer Reports - Buying Advice: Clothes Dryers
  3. Union of Concerned Scientists - Clean Laundry without Dirtying the Environment
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