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Recyclebank

  • David B. 5 months ago
    I think your question is not precise enough. I believe it is possible for borosilicate glass can be recycled into new products made of borosilicate glass. The problem is not if it can be recycled but rather than the process is not economical. There is not enough borosilicate glass that is disposed of to make collecting it, shipping it, and processing it affordable to get borosilicate cullet into the manufacturing process for new products.
    • BenD@Recyclebank 5 months ago

      Hi David, 

      Good point. It is technically possible to recycle (or downcycle) borosilicate glass, but the lack of a market for recycled borosilicate glass plays a big part in why it's not accepted curbside and not often recycled. Another big hurdle would be keeping it separate from container glass, because it would contaminate the batch. And because borosilicate glass represents such a small percentage of overall consumer glass, it has yet to become viable to recycle at scale. We try to keep these daily questions simple, but sometimes that creates a lack of nuance. The question has been updated to be more precise.

  • John D. 5 months ago
    A contaminant to ordinary glass recycling, but that doesn't mean it's not recyclable.
    • Marc R. 5 months ago
      I would think that manufacturers recycle cookware that is broken or defective along with other manufacturing waste. Recycling just isn't available to consumers. I would think that there would be some collection system if not for the cost related to the weight of the glass--the real and environmental costs of mailing or shipping may outweigh the benefits. Also, there are two types of cookware glass, one more resistant to thermal shock (borosilicate) and the other less likely to break when dropped (tempered soda-lime glass, to which Pyrex switched a number of years ago), and they probably cannot be mixed.
    • John D. 5 months ago
      Yeah I would think so too since it just appears to require higher temperature melting. But of course currently unrealistic at the consumer level. Interesting on the Pyrex, my city allows tempered glass.